Thomas H. Sullivan

Attorney at Law

Latest Blog Posts

Can a Non-U.S. Citizen Create an Estate Plan in the U.S.?

Posted on: April 10th, 2020
The United States has experienced a surge in immigration since 1970, and there are now approximately 45 million foreign-born people living in the United States. Some of them have become U.S. citizens, but many non-citizens live in the United States as well. In 2019 alone, approximately 1,031,000 foreign nationals obtained lawful permanent resident status. It is not only permissible, but essential for those individuals, like U.S. citizens, to have estate plans in place. There are a number of special issues non-citizens may need to consider....

COVID-19: A Reminder of Why Estate Planning Is Important

Posted on: April 7th, 2020
Coronavirus has been all over the news—and with good reason. For some people, it can turn into a serious illness if contracted. Thankfully, for the great majority of people who have contracted the disease, the symptoms appear to be relatively mild. Nevertheless, it is crucial for everyone, particularly those who are in good health, to continue to take all the steps necessary to protect those around us who are more vulnerable to becoming seriously ill if they are exposed to the coronavirus...

Writing Your Own Obituary as an Addition to Your Estate Plan

Posted on: March 29th, 2020
An obituary can be much more than just a dry announcement of the time and location of your funeral or memorial service. It can be a way to share your life story, communicating information about significant events and people, as well as important values you would like to impart to others. You do not need to leave this task for grieving family members to do after you pass away: Instead, writing your own obituary can be an important part of your estate planning that you can do today....

What Happens When Your Disabled Child Turns 18

Posted on: March 29th, 2020
When your child is under the age of 18, you, as their parent, can make most, if not all decisions, on their behalf. However, when your child turns 18, the law views them as an adult, and you no longer have the ability to control what and how decisions are made, or even receive relevant information about those decisions. For most parents, this is a rite of passage. They just have to sit back and watch their children leave the nest and begin their adult lives. But what if you have a child who is disabled? That child may need help making financial or medical decisions: What will happen to them? How can you step back in and continue to care for them if needed?...

Reconsidering Your Role in Others' Estate Plans

Posted on: March 27th, 2020
It is important to think carefully about your ability or willingness to serve as an executor or trustee for someone else. If a family member or friend has asked you to serve as the executor of his or her estate or as trustee of a trust he or she is creating, there are a number of factors you should consider before accepting either of these important roles. If you have already accepted the role of trustee or executor for a family member or loved one, but are no longer able or willing to do so, it is important to resign in the way required by law (though if you are a trustee, the trust document may specify a particular method for resigning that might differ from the state law)....

Ancillary Probate

Posted on: March 18th, 2020
Many people own property in more than one state—perhaps a vacation home in Florida, a rental property in a former home state, or even a car titled in another state. It is important to think about how that property will be handled as you create an estate plan. It may be necessary for there to be an additional probate proceeding called ancillary probate. Through proper estate planning, however, this result can be made less burdensome or even avoided....
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